Delays expected at border as U.S. agents reassigned to Mexican entry points

You may want to add extra time to your itinerary during your next jaunt to America, especially if you're driving.
More than 700 U.S. border agents have been moved from their posts at Canadian crossings to new duties along the southern U.S. border.
With the summer travel season about to enter full swing, that could mean longer-than-normal wait times at checkpoints and other points of entry.
Earlier this week, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) said that 731 northern border agents are in the process of being sent south to the U.S.-Mexico border. That number includes CBP workers from land, air and ocean points of entry, meaning delays could be inevitable no matter what type of transportation one takes to the United States.
Earlier in the year, it was estimated that about 100 agents would be moved.
Predictably, shop owners and other businesses that rely on cross-border traffic during tourist season are concerned. If crossings at heavily travelled checkpoints in places like New Brunswick and Ontario are suddenly backed up thanks to a lack of available agents, some holiday-makers might choose to stay in their own backyard instead of touring to the States.
Congress has waded into the fray, with thirteen bipartisan members writing to Homeland Security in an efforts to make their apprehensions known, citing damage to tourism and trade as key concerns. CBP has understandably not specified from which stations officers are being moved but did say they are being taken from over 300 points of entry.
What does this mean for the average gearhead who's driving to the States for leisure or to pick up a piece of memorabilia at Barrett-Jackson? Pack a lunch and plan ahead, essentially. You'll probably need an extra stash of patience, too.
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